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Article
Published: 2019-09-25

Open-holed trapdoor spiders of the genus Teyl (Mygalomorphae: Nemesiidae: Anamini) from Western Australia’s Pilbara bioregion: a new species and expanded phylogenetic assessment

Department of Terrestrial Zoology, Western Australian Museum, Welshpool, WA 6106, Australia. School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. School of Natural Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia.
Department of Terrestrial Zoology, Western Australian Museum, Welshpool, WA 6106, Australia. Biodiversity and Geosciences Program, Queensland Museum, South Brisbane, QLD 4101, Australia.
Biodiversity and Geosciences Program, Queensland Museum, South Brisbane, QLD 4101, Australia.
Department of Terrestrial Zoology, Western Australian Museum, Welshpool, WA 6106, Australia.
Department of Terrestrial Zoology, Western Australian Museum, Welshpool, WA 6106, Australia. School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.
Araneae biogeography Crassitarsae new species taxonomy

Abstract

The open-holed trapdoor spiders of the genus Teyl Main, 1975 from the Pilbara bioregion of Western Australia are investigated. A single endemic species from the southern Pilbara, T. heuretes sp. nov., is newly described, representing the northern-most occurrence of the genus in Australia. Legacy molecular data for Australian Nemesiidae, along with newly generated sequences for all described species of Teyl known from Western Australia, are analysed using Maximum Likelihood methods, providing molecular data for T. heuretes and an expanded phylogenetic assessment of the genus.

 

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How to Cite

HUEY, J. A., RIX, M. G., WILSON, J. D., HILLYER, M. J., & HARVEY, M. S. (2019). Open-holed trapdoor spiders of the genus <em>Teyl</em> (Mygalomorphae: Nemesiidae: Anamini) from Western Australia’s Pilbara bioregion: a new species and expanded phylogenetic assessment. Zootaxa, 4674(3), 349–362. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4674.3.3