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Editorial
Published: 2018-12-28

“Palaeoentomology”: A modern journal for a science dealing with the past

State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy, Center for Excellence in Life and Paleoenvironment, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, People’s Republic of China. Lebanese University, Faculty of Science II, Fanar, Natural Sciences Department, Fanar - El-Matn, PO box 26110217, Lebanon.
Laboratory of Evolutionary Entomology and Museum of Amber Inclusions, Department of Invertebrate Zoology and Parasitology, Faculty of Biology, University of Gdańsk, 59, Wita Stwosza St., PL80-308, Gdańsk, Poland
State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy, Center for Excellence in Life and Paleoenvironment, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, People’s Republic of China. Department of Earth Sciences, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD, UK
J. Linsley Gressitt Center for Research in Entomology, Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, Hawai‘i 96817, USA
State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy, Center for Excellence in Life and Paleoenvironment, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, People’s Republic of China.
Palaeoentomology

Abstract

Palaeoentomology started in the late XVIIIth century, shortly after the 10th edition of Linnaeus’ Systema Naturae (the foundation of modern taxonomy), when papers on the curiosities of insects entombed in fossil resins were published. The beginning of XIXth century (with the growing interest in geological sciences and prehistoric life) witnessed the first attempts to study and describe insects from sedimentary rocks. This discipline then developed during the XIXth and beginning of the XXth centuries; and resulted in some major works and reviews (summarizing the knowledge on fossil insects and other terrestrial arthropods) published in the geological and biological literature. The XXth century was a period of relatively slow but constant development in palaeoentomology, during which the famous “Treatise on invertebrate paleontology: Arthropoda 4. Superclass Hexapoda” (cataloguing the knowledge on fossil insects) was published (Carpenter, 1992). At the beginning of XXIst century, palaeoentomology grew significantly and exponentially; and two major manuals (“History of insects” and “Evolution of the insects”) were published (Rasnitsyn & Quicke, 2002; Grimaldi & Engel, 2005, respectively). These manuals helped to encourage more students and researchers to work on fossil insects and other terrestrial arthropods.

 

References

  1. Carpenter, F.M. (1992) Treatise on invertebrate paleontology. Part R, Arthropoda 4: Superclass Hexapoda 3. Geological Society of America, New York, 277 pp.

    Grimaldi, D. & Engel, M.S. (2005) Evolution of the insects. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 755 pp.

    Rasnitsyn, A.P. & Quicke, D.L.J. (2002) History of insects. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, Boston, London, 517 pp.

    https://doi.org/10.1007/0-306-47577-4