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Article
Published: 2020-08-04

Magnolia poqomchi, a new species of subsection Magnolia (Magnoliaceae) from San Cristóbal Verapaz, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala

Universidad del Valle de Guatemala, Facultad de Ciencias y Humanidades, Departamento de Biología, 18 avenida 11-95, zona 15, Guatemala, Guatemala
Universidad del Valle de Guatemala, Facultad de Ciencias y Humanidades, Departamento de Biología, 18 avenida 11-95, zona 15, Guatemala, Guatemala
Universidad del Valle de Guatemala, Facultad de Ciencias y Humanidades, Departamento de Biología, 18 avenida 11-95, zona 15, Guatemala, Guatemala
Universidad del Valle de Guatemala, Centro de Estudios Ambientales y Biodiversidad, Herbario UVAL, edificio II2, 18 avenida 11-95, zona 15, Guatemala, Guatemala
Herbario IBUG, Laboratorio de Ecosistemática, Instituto de Botánica, Departamento de Botánica y Zoología, Universidad de Guadalajara, Camino Ing. Ramón Padilla Sánchez 2100, Nextipac, Zapopan CP 45221, Jalisco, Mexico
Magnoliids Magnoliaceae

Abstract

In the last decade, several species of magnolias have been described for Guatemala, five of which are found in Alta Verapaz, where, during an exploratory survey, we found a specimen that did not correspond morphologically to any previously reported species. To obtain material and determine phenology, several individuals were monitored for a year. Here, we describe this as a new species of Magnolia subsection Magnolia (Magnoliaceae). It is distributed in the cloud forest of San Cristóbal Verapaz, Alta Verapaz, and is culturally important for the local villagers. It differs from other similar species, M. montebelloensis and M. tribouillierana, in having an abruptly acuminate leaf apex (drip tip), larger flowers, purple staminophores and more stamens, among other traits. According to IUCN criteria, M. poqomchi is critically endangered [B1ab (iii), B2ab (iii)]. Additionally, we include a dichotomous key and distribution map for the genus in Guatemala. Taking this record into account, there are a total of ten native species reported for Guatemala, making it an important centre of species diversity for magnolias.