Palaeoentomology https://www.mapress.com/pe <p><strong>Palaeoentomology </strong>is the official journal of the <a href="http://fossilinsects.net/">International Palaeoentomological Society</a> (IPS). It is an international peer-reviewed scientific journal, which publishes high quality, original research contributions as well as review papers. Papers are published in English and they cover a wide spectrum of topics in palaeoentomology, fossil terrestrial arthropods and amber research, i.e. systematic palaeontology, morphology, diversity, palaeogeography, palaeoecology, palaeobehavior, evolutionary and phylogenetic studies on fossil insects and terrestrial arthropods, biostratigraphy, taphonomy, and amber (deposits, inclusions, geochemistry, curation). Descriptions of new methods (analytical, instrumental or numerical) should be relevant to the broad scope of the journal.</p> <p> </p> <p>Palaeoentomology is the flag journal of IPS, who is responsible for the editing of this journal. For more info about IPS, please contact Prof. Dr. Hab. Dany Azar, Lebanese University, Lebanon. danyazar@ul.edu.lb</p> en-US <span lang="EN-GB">Authors need to complete and return an </span><span lang="EN-GB"><a href="/phytotaxa/images/copyright.rtf">Assignment of Copyright</a> </span><span lang="EN-GB">form when a paper is accepted for publication. Authors from institutions that do not allow transfer of copyrights to publishers (e.g. government institutions such as USDA, CSIRO) should attach a copyright waiver or similar document.</span> dyhuang@nigpas.ac.cn (Diying Huang) palaeoentomology@mapress.com (Journal support team) Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 OJS 3.3.0.6 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 <strong>Description of two new species of Dirhagini (Coleoptera, Eucnemidae, Melasinae) from Myanmar amber</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.5 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">Two new species of Dirhagini are described from Cretaceous Myanmar amber: <em>Cenomana grandis</em> <strong>sp. nov.</strong> and <em>Protomicrorhagus latus</em> <strong>sp. nov.</strong> Based on the new specimen, the diagnosis of the genus <em>Protomicrorhagus</em> Muona, 2020 is revised, and <em>Protomicrorhagus brevis</em> Muona, 2020 is re-described. An identification key to all Dirhagini species from Myanmar amber is provided. Prothoracic structures of Cretaceous and modern Dirhagini species are discussed.</span></span></span></p> XIN-YU HAN, JYRKI MUONA, YAN-CHEN ZHAO, DONG REN Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.5 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 <strong>Late is not too late: redescriptions of some Carboniferous insects from Western Europe studied by Daniel Laurentiaux (Palaeodictyoptera, Paoliida)</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.6 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">Professor Daniel Laurentiaux studied in his state thesis several Carboniferous (Bashkirian—Moscovian) insects from Belgium and Germany, but these were never formally described except in his doctoral thesis. Among the Palaeodictyoptera, we redescribe the spilapterid<em> Spilapterina</em> <em>nigra</em>, the dictyoneurid <em>Arltia occidentalis</em>, and we discuss the graphiptilid <em>Patteiskya bouckaerti</em> Laurentiaux, 1958b. We also redescribe the paoliid <em>Parafouquea belgica</em>.</span></span></span></p> ANDRÉ NEL, HEMEN SENDI, NINON ROBIN, BERNARD DELCAMBRE, BERNARD MOTTEQUIN Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.6 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 <strong>A new sawfly from the Paleocene of Menat (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae)</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.7 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="color: #030304;">The new tenthredinid</span><span style="color: #030304;"><em> Palaeocaiina menatensis</em></span> <span style="color: #030304;"><strong>gen. et sp. nov.</strong></span><span style="color: #030304;"> is described and illustrated from the Paleocene of Menat (Puy-de-Dôme, France). Although its preservation complicates the observation of several key characters useful to distinguish between tenthredinid subfamilies, we decided to place this new taxon within the tribe</span> <span style="color: #030304;">Allantini of the subfamily Allantinae. Its venation of fore- and hind wings combined with the shape of its ovipositor sheaths leads us assume that </span><span style="color: #030304;"><em>Palaeocaiina </em></span><span style="color: #030304;"><strong>gen. nov.</strong></span><span style="color: #030304;"> is possibly related to the extant genus </span><span style="color: #030304;"><em>Caiina</em></span><span style="color: #030304;"> Wei, 2004 distributed in the east Palearctic. Interestingly, this new genus is the oldest known fossil of the subfamily Allantinae.</span></span></span></span></p> ANDRÉ NEL, MEI-CAI WEI, GENG-YUN NIU, CORENTIN JOUAULT Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.7 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 <strong><em>Gomphocopris ashworthi</em> gen. et sp. nov. (Coleoptera, Scarabaeinae, Homocoprini): An additional new Chilean fossil genus and species extinct at the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.8 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">Based on male and female fossil beetle remains recorded in the Pilauco deposits (northern Chilean Patagonia), a new and extinct dung beetle genus and species from an upper Pleistocene sequence (16.4 to 12.8 kyr BP) namely, <em>Gomphocopris ashworthi</em> <strong>gen. et sp. nov.</strong> (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Homocoprini) is described and illustrated. The morphological analysis of these fossil remains suggest that this extinct genus and species are placed into the tribe Homocoprini due to presence of supplementary carina in the lateral area in the pronotum. Moreover, this new taxon is separated from the extant Homocoprini species by the absence hypomeral carina (well developed in all extant species); cephalic horn in males with a distinct posterior projection apically (absent in the extant species), and the unique shapes and disposition of the pronotal lobes in major male and female. We suggest that this dung beetle genus and species became extinct in the late Pleistocene to early Holocene as a consequence of the drastic environmental changes, and the extinction of most of the large mammals, which were the organisms that provided feces for the development of their larvae.</span></span></span></p> FRANCISCO TELLO, FRANÇOIS GÉNIER, MARIO PINO, MICHELE ROSSINI, JOSÉ R. VERDÚ Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.8 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 <strong><em>Cretacetrocta</em>, a new genus of barklice from the Early Cretaceous Lebanese amber</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.9 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="color: #030304;">Pachytroctidae is a diverse extant family of Troctomorpha, </span><span style="color: #030304;">represented by few fossil taxa from the Cretaceous ambers of </span><span style="color: #030304;">Myanmar and Lebanon, and a single species from the Eocene </span><span style="color: #030304;">amber of France (Oise). Herein, we describe and illustrate a new monospecific genus </span><span style="color: #030304;"><em>Cretacetrocta libanella</em></span><span style="color: #030304;"> Hakim &amp; Azar </span><span style="color: #030304;"><strong>gen. et sp. nov.</strong></span><span style="color: #030304;"> from the Lower Cretaceous Bqaatouta amber outcrop (Lebanon). The new taxon is tentatively assigned to Pachytroctidae, and the only hitherto record from Lebanese amber of the subfamily Tapinellinae. The new finding reveals potential unreliability of the character ‘nodulus’ as a key diagnostic characteristic of the family, at the very least among fossil representatives. On the other hand, sexual dimorphism, a common trait in modern species of the Pachytroctidae, remains unveiled among extinct taxa.</span></span></span></span></p> MARINA HAKIM, MOUNIR MAALOUF, DANY AZAR Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.9 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 <strong>The first sphagnum bug (Hemiptera: Hebridae) from the Late Cretaceous Kachin amber</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.10 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="color: #07080d;">A new genus and species of Hebridae, </span><span style="color: #07080d;"><em>Archaeohebrus alius</em></span> <span style="color: #07080d;"><strong>gen. et sp. nov.</strong></span><span style="color: #07080d;">, is described from the Late Cretaceous Kachin amber. The new genus is assigned to the Hebridae based on the bucculae elevated posteriorly forming a pair of ridges, short transverse mesoscutellum, and triangular metanotal elevation. This new genus differs from other genera of Hebridae in the forewing having three cells, three-segmented tarsi, and terminally inserted genital segments. The new genus might represent the most basal lineage of Hebridae, and the forewing venation of this Cretaceous </span><span style="color: #07080d;">hebrids hints at a close relationship between the Mesoveliidae</span><span style="color: #07080d;"> and Hebridae.</span></span></span></span></p> XIAO-YU ZHANG, DONG REN, YUN-ZHI YAO Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.10 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 <strong>Cretaceous caddisflies (Trichoptera: Polycentropodidae) in mid-Cretaceous amber from northern Myanmar</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.11 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">A new species of caddisfly, <em>Neucentropus wichardi</em> <strong>sp. </strong><strong>nov.</strong>, from the <em>Neureclipsis</em> cluster in the Polycentropodidae Ulmer, 1903 is described from the mid-Cretaceous amber of Myanmar. The original description of <em>Electrocentropus dilucidus</em> Wichard, 2021 is modified with further features. The absence of forewing fork IV and the fusion of the Sc and R<sub>1</sub> before reaching the wing margin in both forewing and hindwing of <em>Electrocentropus </em>indicate that the genus is probably the sister group of all other genera of the <em>Neureclipsis</em> cluster. The fossil findings of Polycentropodidae from different geological periods are summarized in tabular form. The comparison shows a high diversity in the Cretaceous of the <em>Neureclipsis</em> cluster, but declined after the Mesozoic and was afterwards replaced by the strong <em>Polycentropus</em> cluster and the <em>Cyrnus</em> cluster.</span></span></span></p> LIN-YUN SHI, JIA-JIA WANG, AI-BING ZHANG, JIA-WEI CHAO Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.11 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 <strong>Two interesting new genera of kalligrammatids (Insecta: Neuroptera) from Upper Cretaceous Myanmar amber</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.12 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">Two new genera and two new species of kalligrammatids, <em>Electrogramma transformatum</em> <strong>gen. et sp. nov.</strong> and <em>Lasiogramma ooideum</em> <strong>gen. et sp. nov.</strong>, are described from the Late Cretaceous Myanmar amber. <em>Electrogramma </em><strong>gen. nov.</strong> differs from other genera by its relatively large wing size; with a set of interlinked veinlets between costal crossveins, multiple rows of cells in base of CuP and AA; CuA distal forked while CuP pectinately branched near wing base in hind wing. And <em>Lasiogramma </em><strong>gen. nov.</strong> is distinguished from other genera by its forewing RP1‒RP3 originating independently from R; costal crossveins absent; RP1 simple; nygma and eye-spot absent. A list of named kalligrammatids is also provided.</span></span></span></p> ZI-HAO PENG, SI-TING LIU, YU-TING CHEN, CHAO-FAN SHI, DONG REN, QIANG YANG Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.12 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 <strong>Spider-ant predation in Oligo-Miocene Mexican amber</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.13 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">Predator-prey interactions have played a pivotal role in the evolutionary history of both predators and prey. Nevertheless, due to spatiotemporal limitations in fossilization, evidence of such interactions is rarely preserved in the fossil record. This report documents the predatory activity of a clubionid sac spider (Araneae: Clubionidae) on an odorous ant (Formicidae: Dolichoderinae: <em>Azteca</em>) preserved in Mexican amber. The fossil material comes from the upper strata of the Simojovel Formation located in Chiapas, Mexico. Its recent dating places it within the temporal confines of the late Oligocene and early Miocene, <em>ca</em>. 24 Mya. This is a direct evidence of spider trapping and feeding behaviour resembling modern habits found in the geological past. The predator-prey interaction in the fossil record provides compelling evidence of biological diversity regarding taxonomic composition and spatial heterogeneity in a tropical and subtropical environment in which these species coexisted.</span></span></span></p> VÍCTOR MANUEL CÓRDOVA-TABARES, FRANCISCO RIQUELME, FERNANDO VARELA-HERNÁNDEZ, EMILIO ESTRADA-RUIZ Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.13 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 <strong>Cretaceous beetles of the Jinju Formation (Coleoptera: Hydrophiloidea)</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.14 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="color: #040408;">We report new discoveries of diverse Hydrophiloidea (Staphyliniformia) from the Albian (Early Cretaceous) Jinju Formation, South Korea, including the genera</span><span style="color: #040408;"><em> Laetopsia </em></span><span style="color: #040408;">Fikáček </span><span style="color: #040408;"><em>et al</em></span><span style="color: #040408;">., 2012 and </span><span style="color: #040408;"><em>Cretotaenia</em></span><span style="color: #040408;"> Ponomarenko, 1977, a new species of </span><span style="color: #040408;"><em>Laetopsia</em></span><span style="color: #040408;"> (</span><span style="color: #040408;"><em>Laetopsia</em></span> <span style="color: #040408;"><em>leei </em></span><span style="color: #040408;"><strong>sp. nov.</strong></span><span style="color: #040408;">), a species putatively shared with the Barremian Yixian Formation of China</span> <span style="color: #040408;">(</span><span style="color: #040408;"><em>L</em></span><span style="color: #040408;">. cf.</span><span style="color: #040408;"><em> hydraenoides</em></span><span style="color: #040408;">), an undetermined species of </span><span style="color: #040408;"><em>Laetopsia</em></span><span style="color: #040408;">, and a new record of </span><span style="color: #040408;"><em>Cretotaenia pallida </em></span><span style="color: #040408;">Ponomarenko are described and illustrated.</span></span></span></span></p> SOO-BIN LEE, CHEN-YANG CAI, MICHAEL S. ENGEL, GI-SOO NAM, JONG-KYUN PARK Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.14 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 <strong>The first fossil mantis lacewing (Neuroptera: Mantispidae) from Australia</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.3 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="color: #070409;">Mantispidae is a cosmopolitan family of neuropteran insects, with approximately 395 extant species (Ohl </span><span style="color: #070409;"><em>et al</em></span><span style="color: #070409;">., 2004; Jepson, 2015; Engel </span><span style="color: #070409;"><em>et al</em></span><span style="color: #070409;">., 2018; Li </span><span style="color: #070409;"><em>et al</em></span><span style="color: #070409;">., 2023). The family includes some of the most distinctive of lacewings owing to their convergent traits with mantises (Mantodea), complete </span><span style="color: #070409;">with elongate prothoraces, prominent and large compound eyes</span><span style="color: #070409;"> on a moveable head, and powerful raptorial forelegs. Indeed, species of the family are referred to as mantis lacewings or mantid lacewings owing to the considerable similarity. As one would suspect, adults are predatory on a variety of small-bodied </span><span style="color: #070409;">arthropods, typically hunting during dusk or night (Snyman </span><span style="color: #070409;"><em>et al</em></span><span style="color: #070409;">.,</span><span style="color: #070409;"> 2020). Larvae are also predators, although some are specialised for particular prey (</span><span style="color: #070409;"><em>e</em></span><span style="color: #070409;">.</span><span style="color: #070409;"><em>g</em></span><span style="color: #070409;">., subfamily Symphrasinae), while those of the nominate subfamily Mantispinae are ectoparasitic on spider egg cases (Redborg, 1998). Extant Mantispidae are found on every continent except Antarctica but show their highest diversity and geographical distribution in Australia and the Americas (Fig. 1A).</span></span></span></span></p> LACHLAN J. HART, MICHAEL S. ENGEL, MICHAEL FRESE, MATTHEW R. MCCURRY Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.3 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 <strong>Early Cretaceous nepomorph bugs from the Wealden of the Weald</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.4 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="color: #040408;">True bugs (Heteroptera) are uncommon in the Lower Cretaceous </span><span style="color: #040408;">Wealden Group of southern England, being represented by occasional terrestrial and aquatic forms (Jarzembowski, 2011). None have been formally described, but a giant water bug (belostomatid) and a saucer bug (naucorid) have been figured from the Weald Clay Formation (Jarzembowski &amp; Coram, 1997: fig. 10; Austen </span><span style="color: #040408;"><em>et al</em></span><span style="color: #040408;">., 2011: fig. 5, respectively). The former was considered closely allied to a stygeonepine from the Las Hoyas Konservat-Lagerstätte in eastern Spain and was subsequently reconstructed as </span><span style="color: #040408;"><em>Iberonepa</em></span><span style="color: #040408;"> sp. (Jarzembowski &amp; Jarzembowski, 2019: fig. 3). Here we report two new nepomorphs, a patterned creeping water bug (naucorid) from the lower Weald Clay and the first Wealden toad bug, adding an ochteroid to the palaeoentomofauna—the largest and oldest gelastocorid known to date.</span></span></span></span></p> EDMUND A. JARZEMBOWSKI, BO WANG Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.4 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 <strong>In memory of Wilfried Wichard (1944–2024)</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.1 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">Wilfried Wichard (WW) passed away in Bonn on 11 May, 2024 at the age of 80 (Fig. 1). He was born at Seppenrade in Westphalia, Germany on 25 April, 1944. From an early age he began to take an interest in nature. He started to collect insects during his high school years in Duisburg and published faunistic papers on Trichoptera. Faunistics remained a constant topic of interest in the first decades of his scientific career. Consequently, after high school he went on to study biology at Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn from 1965–1971. After graduating in 1971, he pursued his interest in the respiration mechanisms of Trichoptera larvae and earned his doctorate in the research group of Prof. Dr. G.H. Bick in 1973. In the following years, he continued to work at the university on issues of ecophysiology, cytology, osmoregulation and respiration, mainly of Trichoptera larvae and pupae, but also of other aquatic groups. Over the years he and his co-authors published a series of high-quality papers with results of their physiological studies supported by the German Research Foundation.</span></span></span></p> WOLFRAM MEY, CHRISTEL HOFFEINS Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.1 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200 <strong>The 9th Fossils X3 and the 7th IPS Meeting in Xi’an (China), April 2024</strong> https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.2 <p lang="en-US" align="justify"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman, serif;"><span style="font-size: small;">Before 1996, few national meetings were held for scientific interest in palaeoentomology, palaeoarthropodology and amber, <em>e.g.</em>, in Germany and Poland. The ever-growing attention to these fields aled to the creation of the Fossil Insect Network in 1996, based in France (Strasbourg), under the patronage of the European Science Foundation. Following that, the first of congresses on Fossil Insects, Arthropods and Amber was held in 1998 as two separate meetings, <em>i.e.</em>, the First Palaeoentomological Conference in Russia (Moscow) and the World Congress on Amber Inclusions in Basque Country, Spain (Vitoria-Gasteiz). At that time, it was decided to hold regular conferences at an interval of four years minimum, which later changed to every three years. Meanwhile, the Brazilian Symposium on Palaeoarthropodology took place in Brazil (Ribeirão Preto) in 2000. The International Palaeoentomological Society (IPS) was created during the second of the congresses, which was held in Poland (Kraków) in 2001. The third congress took place in South Africa (Pretoria) in 2005, for the first time combining the three meetings, <em>i.e.</em>, the Palaeoentomological Conference, the World Congress on Amber Inclusions, and the International Meeting on Palaeoarthropodology together as the Fossils X3 under the umbrella of the IPS. The fourth congress was held in Basque Country, Spain (Vitoria-Gasteiz) in 2007, the fifth in China (Beijing) in 2010, the sixth in Lebanon (Byblos) in 2013, the seventh in Scotland (Edinburgh) in 2016, the eighth in the Dominican Republic (Santo Domingo) in 2019, the nineth in China (Xi’an) in 2024, and the tenth is planned for Morocco (El Jadida) in 2027. It is noteworthy that, during the seventh congress, October 1<sup>st</sup> was declared as the ‘International Fossil Insects Day’.</span></span></span></p> MARINA HAKIM, SIBELLE MAKSOUD, DANY AZAR Copyright (c) 2024 Magnolia press limited https://www.mapress.com/pe/article/view/palaeoentomology.7.3.2 Sat, 29 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +1200